Look Back: Playing Resident Evil 6 For The First Time in 2016

Resident Evil 6 has garnered quite the reputation as being the most reviled entry in the mainline series. It’s a game I have yet to play until very recently and after finally taking the plunge, I’m left utterly baffled by the hate. Yes, Resident Evil 6 is far from a masterpiece. It has some pretty blatant issues and frustrating design inconsistencies, but to call this a “bad” game is extreme. 

I get it. There are these hardcore series stalwarts that hate change and automatically insult any new installment in a series that’s different because they’re regressive and can’t handle change. Every fanbase has those people. Who cares that Resident Evil 6 isn’t a horror game? It was clear from the start that it was going to be an action game and makes no attempts at hiding that. 

You can complain all you want that the series’ roots are gone, but they’ve been gone for years and this game embraces that by doing a hard left turn, challenging your preconceived notions of what a Resident Evil game is. Put simply, on a purely mechanical level, Resident Evil 6 is the most satisfying RE game to play. 

First impressions upon beginning the prologue are iffy. The opening playable sequence is a tightly directed and controlled vertical slice that entirely removes control from the player. When the tutorial prompts you to use the left stick to move, Leon will move forward regardless of which direction you move the analog stick. It’s as if Resident Evil 6 thinks you’re a fucking dumbass and can’t handle control in video games. Once it begins properly,though, it shines brightly, but not too bright. 

Let’s get this out of the way. Resident Evil 6 is not what I’d call a good game; more along the lines of average, but that’s the problem with consumers in this day and age. They hear anything less than “amazing” and the game is not worth their time. Plenty of average games can be filled with a fair amount of fun and interesting ideas/mechanics. RE 6 is one of those games.

No matter how directionless the story and level design becomes; no matter how contrived and scripted its set pieces can be, Resident Evil 6 feels so good to play. The mobility and control is something I never thought I’d see in a Resident Evil game. The ability to sprint and slide while still shooting is a blessing. Additionally, you can quick turn during the slide and still be laying on your back, ready to shoot at any enemies from behind with style. 

There’s also the fact that your character seamlessly transitions from cover to laying on the ground and vice versa just from moving the analog stick back and forth. If you’re on your back against a wall, the camera switches to a first person perspective so as to not cause camera issues. I also haven’t even begun to mention the contextual melee animations as well as the No Mercy mode.

Resident Evil 6 isn’t a game I’d revisit time and time again because of how well designed it is like Resident Evil 4 or even Resident Evil 5, but it’s far better than butthurt fanboys make it out to be. I was pleasantly surprised by how good the game felt on a purely mechanical level. In that respect, this is the best RE game by miles. 

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Onechanbara Z2 Chaos Review(7/10)

Onechanbara Z2 Chaos is another game in the pantheon of erotic Japanese games that markets itself as this sexy experience you’ll get off to, but like so many other games of this type, the fan service is relatively light. Cutscenes do show off the sexy cast of characters, but these scenes are so brief and infrequent that they do little to titillate. In addition, due to the nature of the game’s musou style combat, it’s difficult to see anything erotic during gameplay. 

When all is said and done, Onechanbara Z2 Chaos is an action game first and a sexy game second. Combat is much more accomplished than expected. It seems simple at first with standard light and heavy attacks, but spend more time with it and you’ll find a fairly complex game underneath. The game stars four characters: Kagura, Saaya, Saki, and Aya. Every character has access to two weapons and a sub weapon, each with their own combos and properties. 

Basic combos are simple to pull off, but every combo string can be interrupted mid-combo and be continued by switching weapons or characters on the fly, continuing a combo string. This on-the-fly switching coupled with other mechanics such as the chase system, which automatically dashes you toward the nearest target and launches them in the air, transforms what would otherwise be mediocre combat.  

Onechanbara Z2 Chaos takes a few hours to master and understand, but once you do, the pacing and fluidity of it all makes it incredibly addictive. Even when the PlayStation 2 era environments with uninspired level design rear their ugly head, the core gameplay is so satisfying that the poor design is mitigated slightly. 

It helps that the game’s story clocks in at around 4 hours, meaning it doesn’t overstay its welcome. The story itself is nothing to write home about. It’s so poorly written with such sporadic pacing that skipping all the cutscenes wont detract from the experience at all unless you really NEED to see that two second ass shot. 

Onechanbara Z2 Chaos is a perfectly competent action game with enough depth to satisfy hardcore action fans, but its limited scope and budget severely impacts the quality of the title. It has the basic mechanics down. All it needs is more polish to become a bonafide classic. 

SCORE: 7/10